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Shaman’s Harvest Reveal New Single ‘The Come Up’

Following the announcement of their brand new studio album ‘Red Hands Black Deeds’, Shaman’s Harvest have released the first single ‘The Come Up’.

An upbeat song that juxtaposes a Motown backbeat with classic Rolling Stones rock and roll swagger, and that delves into depression. “There’s so much negativity on social media today a lot of people struggling with real issues and with where we’re at as a nation,” says singer Nathan Hunt. But, “The Come Up” is also an acknowledgment of the singer’s own battle with depression. “It’s therapeutic for myself,” he says. “It’s just about sometimes when you just can’t change shit, you got to realize you can’t mold everything in your life and you kind of just have to roll with the punches,” says Hunt, who overcame throat cancer in 2014 that could’ve derailed the band, but didn’t.

Red Hands Black Deeds is a darker, visceral, and more layered sound than past repertoire. The album ranges from the ominous, haunting vibes of the title track prelude, “A Longer View,” “The Devil In Our Wake,” and “Scavengers” – which could fit just as easily on a horror film soundtrack as it does on this rock band’s album – to quieter, more vulnerable moments as heard on “Tusk and Bone” and “Long Way Home.” Lyrically, the band also ventured into new territory, taking on the current political, social, and economic struggles the USA is facing as a nation under the new administration. “Red Hands Black Deeds touches upon the darker nature inside all of us,” says Hunt. “The whole record has a contrast and push and pull tension – a juxtaposition of good and bad or questioning what is right and wrong. The record ended up having a concept, though we weren’t intending it to,” says Hunt.

The writing of the record began in November 2016 at the time of the US presidential election, so it’s no wonder there are social and political undertones to many of the songs. “The tension in the record kind of speaks for itself. There’s a dark anxiety, tension-filled feeling that reflects what’s going on in the world,” says Hamler.

Their Mascot Records debut, Smokin’ Hearts & Broken Guns in 2014, garnered more than 33 million streams. The album’s “In Chains” peaked at #11 on the Media Base chart after a run of 22 weeks at Active Rock radio. It also spent over four months in the Top 10 of iTunes Metal Songs Chart. The song’s video has more than 3 million views on YouTube, while the band has a cumulative 8 million YouTube views.

Shaman’s Harvest has had equal success on the touring front. They’ve toured or shared the stage with;AC/DC, Alice In Chains, Godsmack, Breaking Benjamin, Seether, Nickelback, Three Doors Down, In This Moment, Daughtry, Cheap Trick, Theory of a Deadman, Hinder, and others, and played major festivals like Rocklahoma, Rock on the Range, Rock Fest, KRockathon, Rockin’ The Rivers, Texas Mutiny, Rock Carnival 2016, High Elevation Rock Festival, and Midwest Rock Fest.

Following the announcement of their brand new studio album ‘Red Hands Black Deeds’, Shaman’s Harvest have released the first single ‘The Come Up’.

An upbeat song that juxtaposes a Motown backbeat with classic Rolling Stones rock and roll swagger, and that delves into depression. “There’s so much negativity on social media today a lot of people struggling with real issues and with where we’re at as a nation,” says singer Nathan Hunt. But, “The Come Up” is also an acknowledgment of the singer’s own battle with depression. “It’s therapeutic for myself,” he says. “It’s just about sometimes when you just can’t change shit, you got to realize you can’t mold everything in your life and you kind of just have to roll with the punches,” says Hunt, who overcame throat cancer in 2014 that could’ve derailed the band, but didn’t.

Red Hands Black Deeds is a darker, visceral, and more layered sound than past repertoire. The album ranges from the ominous, haunting vibes of the title track prelude, “A Longer View,” “The Devil In Our Wake,” and “Scavengers” – which could fit just as easily on a horror film soundtrack as it does on this rock band’s album – to quieter, more vulnerable moments as heard on “Tusk and Bone” and “Long Way Home.” Lyrically, the band also ventured into new territory, taking on the current political, social, and economic struggles the USA is facing as a nation under the new administration. “Red Hands Black Deeds touches upon the darker nature inside all of us,” says Hunt. “The whole record has a contrast and push and pull tension – a juxtaposition of good and bad or questioning what is right and wrong. The record ended up having a concept, though we weren’t intending it to,” says Hunt.

The writing of the record began in November 2016 at the time of the US presidential election, so it’s no wonder there are social and political undertones to many of the songs. “The tension in the record kind of speaks for itself. There’s a dark anxiety, tension-filled feeling that reflects what’s going on in the world,” says Hamler.

Their Mascot Records debut, Smokin’ Hearts & Broken Guns in 2014, garnered more than 33 million streams. The album’s “In Chains” peaked at #11 on the Media Base chart after a run of 22 weeks at Active Rock radio. It also spent over four months in the Top 10 of iTunes Metal Songs Chart. The song’s video has more than 3 million views on YouTube, while the band has a cumulative 8 million YouTube views.

Shaman’s Harvest has had equal success on the touring front. They’ve toured or shared the stage with;AC/DC, Alice In Chains, Godsmack, Breaking Benjamin, Seether, Nickelback, Three Doors Down, In This Moment, Daughtry, Cheap Trick, Theory of a Deadman, Hinder, and others, and played major festivals like Rocklahoma, Rock on the Range, Rock Fest, KRockathon, Rockin’ The Rivers, Texas Mutiny, Rock Carnival 2016, High Elevation Rock Festival, and Midwest Rock Fest.

More information on the official facebook page

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